2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV

#79
in Midsize SUVs
2018 MODEL

$43,075

6.2

Overall Rating

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Overview

The Toyota 4Runner has enjoyed a production run of more than 30 years now. While most of the SUVs of today have come dangerously close to crossover territories but the 4Runner still retains the rugged body on frame chassis and an even enhanced off-road prowess. The 2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro off-road variant comes equipped with anything and everything that you might need to conquer those off-road trails.

A thunderous 4.0L V6 paired to a 5-speed auto box is standard on the 4Runner TRD Pro. Even though the engine is loud and brash, the power produced is measly 270 hp which makes it sort of a dude on road.

The 2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro carries a price tag of $43,075. With a price as steep as it is, it offers a solution to a very particular problem. It can demonstrate its ability at the click of a button and climb over untraversable terrain like a hot knife through butter.

See detailed review »

Pros

Off-road Champion

Imposing looks

Large towing capacity

Cons

Outdated exterior and interior

On-road ride not upto mark

Missing modern Infotainment

No option to get modern safety features

What's New?

No major changes



Styles

 2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV in Magnetic Gray Metallic color  2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV in Classic Silver Metallic color  2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV in Cavalry Blue color  2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV in blizzard pearl color  2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV in Barcelona Red Metallic color
Magnetic Gray Metallic

Vehicle images are guides only and may not reflect the model's exact specifications/features– exact specifications/features should be confirmed with the seller.

Ratings

Engine

6.0

Interior

6.0

Exterior

6.5

6.2

OVERALL RATING

Variant Name

MSRP


 2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV base

base

Fuel: Regular unleaded, Transmission: Automatic, Seats: 5

$43,075

Configurations
TRD PRO 4dr SUV 4WD (4.0L 6cyl 5A)
Seating: 5 HP: 270-hp @ 5600 rpm
Torque: 278 lbs.-ft. @ 4400 rpm MPG(City/Combined/Highway): MPG(17/18/20)

Expert Review


carhp editor October 6, 2018

6.2

Overall Rating


 

6.0/10
Engine

 
 

6.0/10
Interior

 

6.5/10
Exterior

 
 
 
 

A thunderous 4.0L V6 paired to a 5-speed auto box is standard on the 4Runner TRD Pro. Even though the engine is loud and brash, the power produced is measly 270 hp which makes it sort of a dude on road. The 2018 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro carries a price tag of $43,075. With a price as steep as it is, it offers a solution to a very particular problem. It can demonstrate its ability at the click of a button and climb over untraversable terrain like a hot knife through butter.

Features

The TRD Pro version of the 4Runner is an out and out off-road standalone variant. It is available with only a single standard configuration.  The TRD badging on the skid plate, blacked out exterior elements and all-terrain tires help it to be spotted amongst a crowd of regular 4Runners.

There is a lot of badging on the inside as well such on the front headrest, floor mats etc that always remind you that you’re traveling in a TRD Pro variant.

Trim Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
MSRP $43,075
Features
  • Locking rear differential
  • 17-inch wheels that are 0.5 inches wider than the SR5’s
  • Crawl control function
  • The interior wears additional TRD badging, and the overhead console gains switches for controlling off-road settings.

Engine

6.0/10

Engine and Transmission

It’s not fast and it doesn’t handle particularly well, but the 2018 Toyota 4Runner has a couple of trick suspension setups ready to attack just about any kind of trail. -thecarconnection

The engine on duty is a 4.0L V6 DOHC SMPI motor churning out 270 horses. It is paired with a 5-speed automatic transmission that is both rugged and reliable. The powertrain configuration is almost older than time itself. Although the system provides much stability to the car as a whole on off-road journeys, it runs out of breath pretty quickly on the tarmac.

After just a brief look on the table of comparison, you’d notice that the 4Runner follows the same old ‘no replacement for displacement’ motto but still fails to develop enough power to give the rivals a competition. All of the vehicles on the list are quite cheaper than the 4runner while providing more power and a better tranny.

Models Toyota 4runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
MSRP $43,075 $30,695 $39,440 $36,325
Engine 4.0L V6 DOHC SMPI 3.6L Pentastar   V6 3.5L DI V6 3.5L Ti-VCT V6
Transmission 5-Speed Automatic 8-Speed Automatic CVT Automatic 6-Speed Automatic
Power 270 hp 295 hp 284 hp 290 hp
Torque 278 lb-ft 260 lb-ft 259 lb-ft 255 lb-ft

Acceleration

The 4Runner was never actually designed to give you speed thrills. The 4.0L V6 powertrain is more suited to run at low range while providing enough torque to climb over highest hills. Taking that under notice, the car does a 0-60 mph run in 8 sec and a quarter mile run in 16.1 sec. Also, the Toyota is one of the least environment-friendly SUVs in the list leaking out 9.8 tons/yr CO2 emissions.

On paper with rivals, the Ford Explorer is the fastest SUV to 60mph @ 6.4 seconds. The Jeep Grand Cherokee and the Nissan Pathfinder both do the same in 7.4 seconds.

Models Toyota 4runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
0-60 MPH 8.0 sec 7.4 sec 7.4 sec 6.4 sec
Quarter mile 16.1 sec 15.9 sec 15.7 sec 16.3 sec
Engine 4.0L 3.6L 3.5L 3.5L
Emission (Tons/yr of CO2 Emissions @ 15K mi/year) 9.8 8.4 8.0 9.8

Ride and Handling

With its body on ladder chassis, the 4Runner can never be expected to feel as agile as its unibody rivals. Still, it has some off-road enhancements that come like the Fox springs on all four sides that help it on rough patches of road and potholes. Off-road performance on the 4runner is unparalleled by even pick up trucks let alone a full size 3 row SUV.

The steering wheel handles the vehicle well enough but it can’t ever hide the fact that it’s controlling a big and hefty full-size SUV. Overall, there is a lot of room for improvement at least as far as on-road performance is concerned.

Braking

The 4runner weighs around 4750 lbs which makes it one of the heavier ones in the segment. This, however, doesn’t disturb the 13.3-inch front rotors and 12.3 inch rear rotors from doing their job. The car does a 60-0 mph halt in a respectable 127 ft.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee with its lighter build a bigger rear brake is the fastest to a 60-0 mph halt in under 120 ft. The Nissan and the Ford both take 125 ft and 123 ft respectively to complete the same halt.

Model Toyota 4runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
Brake Front(in) 13.3 13.0 12.6 12.8
Brake Rear(in) 12.3 13.0 12.1 12.8
Curb weight(lbs) 4750 4625 4489 4629
60-0 MPH (ft.) 127 120 125 123

Fuel Economy

The TRD Pro is another animal, maybe a wild one. It uses a tweaked suspension with reworked springs and Bilstein remote-reservoir dampers, Nitto all-terrain tires, skid plates"and other TRD parts. We've had some off-road time behind the wheel, and it aced every test we put it to. - Autoblog 

Owing to its eternity old engine and transmission combo, the Toyota struggles to maintain a decent fuel economy. The FE stats 17/20/18 is barely at par with the competition. Notable, off-roading on the 4Runner will cause the FE to dip even further.

The Pathfinder is the most fuel efficient of the group but only by 4 mpg. The Jeep and the Ford are almost the same as the Toyota in terms of fuel economy.

Model Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
MPG (city) 17 18 19 16
MPG (highway) 20 25 26 22
MPG (combined) 18 20 22 18

Interior

6.0/10

The 2018 Toyota 4Runner’s trucky roots force some interior compromises, but it is quite roomy...The tall-riding 2018 Toyota 4Runner requires a big leap to get in, but once you’re there, it’s comfortable and screwed together well. -thecarconnection

Seating and Comfort

The Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro utilizes a lot of cheap materials on the inside but still manages to remain comfortable for the passengers. There is enough knee and headroom for both front and rear passengers. There is no hindrance in getting in or out of the car either.

On paper with rivals, the 4Runner is actually the smallest in terms of passenger space. Both Nissan Pathfinder and Ford Explorer share the same head/shoulder/led room but the Ford manages to find the top spot with its mighty big 151.7 ft.cube. passenger volume.

Model Toyota 4runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
Passenger capacity 5 5 7 7
Passenger Volume (ft cube) N/A 105.4 137.8 151.7
Front (Head/Shoulder/Leg) (In.) 39.3/57.8/41.7 39.9/58.7/40.3 42.2/60.9/42.2 41.4/61.5/42.9
Second (Head/Shoulder/Leg) (In.) 38.6/57.8/32.9 39.2/58.0/38.6 39.4/60.4/41.7 40.6/61.0/39.5
Third (Head/Shoulder/Leg) (In.) N/A N/A 37.8/57.1/30.7 37.8/50.8/32

Infotainment System

The infotainment on the Toyota is state of the art 90’s tech and has nothing to do with modern infotainment tech. There is a 6.1-inch screen loaded with the standard Toyota Entune MMI. The system is pretty simple to use and takes direct output fairly easily. The response times are good too with the minimal amount of lags during inputs. There is also an in-built nav system available.

Cargo Capacity

"While the cabin may seem dated with regards to the look, feel, and function of many of the switches and accessories, it is well constructed, comfortable, and spacious."- Traction Life

You’re never too short on utility on the 4Runner as its boxy design language provides it a good amount of cargo capacity. You’re never going to regret taking one of these vehicles on an airport run.

The Nissan Pathfinder is the only vehicle that sports a larger 47.4 ft.cube. Space behind the 2nd row against 46.3 ft.cube. of the 4Runner.

Model Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
Behind 3rdRow(ft.cube) 46.3 N/A 16.2 21.0
With 3rd Row folded (ft.cube) 46.3 36.3 (w/2nd row folded) 47.4 43.8
With All Seats folded (ft.cube) 88.8 68.3 79.5 80.7

Exterior

6.5/10

"The TRD Pro trim is the undisputed badass of the 4Runner family, exceeding even the Off-Road trims in terms of off-road equipment, adding a few basic trail-ready extras that might be your first steps toward customizing your truck for tougher trail conditions if you went your own way."- Carbuzz

Dimension and Weight

The Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro, with all its off-road gadgetry including the roof racks, is the heaviest amongst its rivals. Also, due to its boxy design and ladder on frame chassis, the 4Runner manages to attain the most ground clearance and be the tallest amongst its rivals.

When comparing all other dimensions with rivals, you can conclude that most of them are about the same size with minor decrease or increase in dimensions.

Model Toyota 4runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
curb weight(lbs) 4750 4625 4489 4629
Length(in) 191.3 189.8 198.5 198.3
Width(in) 75.8 76.5 77.3 78.9
Height(in) 72.0 68.1 69.5 70.0
Ground clearance(in) 9.6 8.6 7.0 8.3
Wheelbase(in) 109.8 114.7 114.2 112.8
Track width(in) F/R 64.1/64.1 63.9/64.1 65.7/65.7 67.0/67.0

Towing Capacity

The Toyota is an off-road centric SUV and was designed to accommodate hauling heavy loads with relative ease. Properly equipped, the 4Runner can tow upto 5000 lbs. But, it sure starts to put a pressure on the engine the moment its towing capacity is reached.

In comparison with rivals, the Pathfinder is the only one that can tow more than the 4Runner. Both the Explorer and Grand Cherokee fail to cause any major issues to the 4Runner.

Model Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 Ford Explorer XLT 4×4
Capacity (lbs) 5000 3500 6000 2000
Drive Train AWD AWD AWD AWD

Safety

The old platform on which the 4Runner is based on is like a thorn in its flesh. Toyota has been able to accommodate only a few selective active safety aids on the 2018 model as well. The structural efficiency tests, however, rate the 4Runner TRD Pro as ‘Good’ in most of the sections.

Safety Features

  • 4-Wheel Traction Control
  • ParkSense Rear Park-Assist with Stop
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Enhanced Accident Response System
  • Tire Pressure Monitoring Display
  • Advanced Multistage Front Airbags
  • LATCH Ready Child Seat Anchor System
  • Supplemental Front Seat-Mounted Side Airbags
  • Supplemental Side-Curtain Airbags
  • Supplemental Side-Curtain Front and Rear Airbags
  • Hill Start Assist
  • ParkView Rear Back-Up Camera

Competition

Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV vs Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo

It doesn’t take rocket science to make out that the Grand Cherokee is far more luxurious vehicle than the 4Runner in and out. Creature comforts, safety features, optional goodies and much more is what the Jeep Grand Cherokee has on its side. The final nail in the coffin is the fact that it fairly cheap than the 4Runner as well.

So finally, Jeep Grand Cherokee has all the pedigree to become your daily driver. It, however, will fall short the moment you go off-road. This where the 4Runner is ahead by leaps and bounds and not to forget, it has a large list of aftermarket parts available easily.

Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV vs Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4

The Nissan Pathfinder SL 4×4 and the Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro are both fine off-roading SUVs. The Pathfinder enjoys a better power figure and a little big feature list. The interior quality is below par in both the vehicle but the Pathfinder will be easier to gulp down the throat than the 4Runner.

But, with the latest installment of the Pathfinder, Nissan has decided to take off the foot from the off-roading aspect of the vehicle and make it more of a family SUV with tech such the CVT making its way in. So, if you desire a complete off-roading centric vehicle, the 4Runner is still your best bet.

Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro SUV vs Ford Explorer XLT 4×4

The Ford Explorer and the Toyota 4Runner have been foes ever since they were launched. Both the vehicles have historically been good off-roading tools. But, Ford has veered off towards the masses and have made the Explorer a fine tarmac riding machine. Both comfortable and tech-loaded, Explorer is miles ahead of the 4Runner in the segment.

The 4Runner on the other side has stuck with its rugged fascia. People who are not into extensive off-roading are better off the Ford Explorer.

Final Verdict

The Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro are one the very few special off road production vehicle of the day. The raised shocks, all terrain tires, roof rack etc, dedicated CRAWL off road mode are some of the features that you’ll seldom find in an SUV straight from the factory. The on road performance and daily usability has been a direct victim of all the off roading tech.

The interior lacks charm, the design is fairly old too and there are no active safety features to boast of. All in all, if you go ahead any buy this car, remember, its true power can be exploited only when its wandering in the wild rather than any smooth surfaced city road.

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